DEFTECH-SCAN January 2021

This Deftech Scan reports on and assesses occurrences in military technology and capability development taking place from late November 2020 through to mid-to-late January 2021 with some additional references to actions that predates the reporting period. It contains reporting on recent activities and announcements in the United States, South Korea, North Korea, China, India, Russia, France, Sweden, Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, NATO, and the European Union.

The “New” Domains of Conflict: This volume has a strong emphasis on current developments and emerging requirements related to three domains that the Defence of Japan 2020 White Paper released in July of last year referred to as the “new domains” of conflict: space, the electromagnetic spectrum, and the cyber-domain. Of course, militaries of all sizes have been operating in these domains for years. However, small, medium, and large-sized militaries are concentrating research and development efforts on and organising around the iterative competitions in these domains.

Source & Full report : DEFTECH

DEFTECH-SCAN November 2020

This DEFTECH SCAN reports on and assesses occurrences in military technology and capability development taking place from late September through late November. This issue in particular reflects the increasing pace and progress of defence technology development and innovation efforts not just in the United States, China, and Russia, but especially in midsized and even small militaries throughout the world. The report includes updates from the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Israel, Australia, France, Japan, and India in addition to the three large militaries mentioned above.

This volume includes a description of a separate demonstration of an energy capture and storage technology for drones that was also developed by Delft Technical University, signalling not just that this particular university is engaged in interesting and potentially impactful research, but more fundamentally the importance of academia and applied research institutes in the defence innovation ecosystem. Assessment of continued development of Russian exoskeletons and China’s drone swarms—both regularly touched on themes in these reports—also appear in this report.

Source & Full report : DEFTECH

Thinking like the «bad guys» for a secure cyberspace

As Scientific Project Manager at armasuisse Science and Technology (S+T), Dr. Alain Mermoud is responsible for Technology Monitoring and Forecasting. Together with Dr. Mathias Humbert, responsible for Privacy and Machine Learning at armasuisse S+T, he is organising the Cyber-Defence Campus Conference from November 3 – 4 in Lausanne.

Is it common practice in the cyber world to align yourself to the «bad guys» processes?

Of course, the police does the same. A good policeman also thinks: «What would the thief do?» Or if you want to make your house safe from burglars, you also have to consider whether they will come in through the window, or through the roof, etc. In addition to my job at armasuisse, I’m also active as an intelligence officer in the Swiss armed forces. The principle is exactly the same there – you have to think like «red» in order to decide what you can do best as «blue». As a defender, it definitely helps to think like an attacker.

So the best cyber specialists are former hackers?

One can say that many cyber-security specialists come from a hacking background. This doesn’t mean that they have a criminal past, as there is such a thing as ethical hacking. The decisive factor is how the knowledge and motivation are used. That’s the difference between «white hat» hackers – the «good guys» and «black hat» hackers, the «bad guys», if you like.

You talk about threat intelligence and open source platforms. Can you explain more about these?

There are various platforms – such as MISP or Open Threat Exchange – on which ethical hackers, as well as companies, can exchange information on potential dangers. One example is MELANI-NET, on which an exchange of information on critical infrastructures, such as hospitals, the SBB or banks, takes place every day.

Source and full article : armasuisse S+T